10 Pointers to Help Your Day

1. CHECK YOUR KNOTS

Look for old knots or “Wind(more likely casting) Knots” that can be weak. Replace Leader if it has knots in it or if it is too short.  Always start the day with new tippit, don’t assume that the tippet you used last week is still good.  If you lose your fly to a fish, look at the end.  If it looks like a curly pig tail, the knot was not tied correctly.

 

2 REPLACE TIPPIT WHEN NEEDED

Replace your tippit before it gets too short, minimum tippit length should not be less than 10” from the fly to the leader.  When nymphing, be prepared to go through more tippit, you will often get hung up on the bottom and have to break off to get loose, this often happens at the tippit knot.

 

3 WATCH YOUR BACK CAST

Don’t be so “focused” on looking forward, it is good to know what obstacles you have behind you. When practicing, watching the back cast will help you learn when stop the rod in the correct position.

 

4 LET FLY FLOAT NATURALLY

Once the Fly is on the water, it needs to float like nothing is attached, don’t let the Fly “Motor Boat” across the Stream (it’s not natural).  Continue to always mend the line, to insure a “Drag Free Drift”

 

5 LOOK FOR SEAMS

Seams are the line between fast moving and slow moving water. Seams are where food will stop or slow and the fish will take it. Seams are often seen as "bubble" or foam lines.

 

6 CAST TO WHERE THE FISH ARE, NOT WHERE THEY ARE NOT.

Fish will most often hold where they have a combination of three things.  Look for water that has all three of these characteristics, this is where the fish will be.  Learning to see or read this water will keep you from wasting time and energy fishing where there are no fish.  Those three things are:

1. Protection from predators 

2. Protection from strong current

3. An abundance of food  

 

7 WHEN NYMPHING, ADJUST INDICATOR AS NEEDED

The Strike Indicator should always be at the correct depth to place the fly in the correct zone 

This should be approximately One and a Half to two times the depth (of the part of the stream you are currently fishing {Best Guess}).  Use a Strike Indicator that is easy to adjust but won’t move when casting.  Also use one that creates the smallest shadow on the water, and one that isn’t too bright especially where the fish are very “educated” 

 

8 KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE FLY

Many “takes” are missed because the angler “lost” the fly in the water or glare.  Point the rod tip at the fly after every mend to keep you on target.  This also helps with creating a Drag Free Drift.  Polarized Sunglasses are a big help with see your fly.

 

9 DON’T LEAN ROD ON CAR OR USE THE ROD AS A LEVER

Industry Studies over the last 25 years have shown that 80% of rod breakage happen AT THE CAR

   Simple Rule

The Rod and Reel should be the VERY LAST THING setup when you get ready to fish 

                        AND   The very FIRST thing to be put away when getting back to the car

Otherwise, put your waders on (pee first), setup your vest/pack, all that kind of stuff before taking the rod out of the tube.  Use a rod tube or transport when moving from one location to another.  Don’t use the rod to try to pull a hung up or snagged fly.  Never set the rod flat on the ground, lean against a tree limb.  Point the rod straight at the fly and pull with the line (Better to lose a fly than break a rod).  Fly rod are not designed to bend or flex at a sharp angle, when stringing up your rod pull additional line out and away the direction of the tip, not back toward the reel.   

 

10 HAVE FUN

Enjoy the Day, we’re out there to relax and have fun enjoying the sport we love or are trying to learn. Fly fishing typically takes us to very beautiful locations > Take It In.  If you get tangled or break off, remember the 3 R’s

                                                                   Relax, Re-Rig and Re-Cast

 

 

 

I would like to add some really great stuff from an older copy of the Fly Fishers Guide to Colorado

 

“Some thoughts on Stream Etiquette” 

By Marty Bartholomew, Author of The Fly fishers Guide to Colorado

 

* How does a flyfisher approach another angler along a stream?

A section of water belongs to the angler who starts fishing it first.  Until that angler moves on to new water, it’s very inconsiderate to crowd.  If you must approach that person, move back from the bank so you don’t disturb any water upstream or down.  And watch your shadow, it can spook fish like crazy.

Is it appropriate to ask what fly is being used?

Yes, but do it politely.  Laws are not written saying you can’t ask a fellow angler a question; just use common sense and be courteous.  I always try to compliment an angler’s efforts before I pry valuable information from him or her.

* What should anglers bring to the stream every single time they fish?

Courtesy, consideration, and common sense.

Here are a few ideas to adhere to and pass along to your fellow anglers:

* An Angler owns a section of water if he or she is the first to fish it.

* It is inconsiderate to crowd another angler.

* A slow moving or stationary angler has the right to remain where he is. If you are moving, leave the water and quietly walk around him.

* If an angler is resting a pool or planning his next move, it is still his water.  Don’t jump in without permission.

* A fisherman working upstream has the right of way over one coming downstream.

* Always yield to another angler that has a fish on his or her line.

* Don’t enter the water directly across from a person fishing the opposite bank.

* Many streams flow through private property.   Recognize that access is a privilege, not a right.  If unsure about access, ask the landowner.  Once permission is secured, don’t trample crops, disturb livestock, leave gates open 

* Try to use visible trails or paths.

* Wade only when necessary.  The aquatic food chain is fragile.

* Don’t litter.  Pick up discarded monofilament, cans, used strike indicators, tippet packages, and carry them out with you to be deposed of properly.

* Familiarize yourself with local and state fishing regulations.

* Drive Slowly in dusty parking lots, foregoing loud music.

 

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